Love

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All three kiddos

Sometimes I try to look inward and analyze my feelings for R.  My love for him is so intense it is almost painful at times- the kind of pain that is an echo of the fear of losing him, knowing it would rend me completely. This intensity of feeling is ever present when I think about R, but it’s not that way when I think of my other two children.  This has bothered me every time I get to that point in the inward analysis.  I try to dissect it, to understand it.  I think about my feelings for each of my children very carefully, and, I hope, objectively.  I always come to the conclusion that I love them each the same amount, I just love them each differently. but never less.  So why the difference in that sense of intensity when I think of R compared to my other two children?

When I sit down and really think of that overwhelming, intense feeling my love has for R, I realize I have felt it about my other children, during discrete periods of high stress when they were in some type of danger or distress.  I felt it for weeks when Mohammad was a newborn.  He had pyloric stenosis and was so sick, literally starving and shrinking before my eyes for his first weeks of life.  He was initially misdiagnosed and by the time they finally hospitalized him and figured out what was wrong he was so sick and dehydrated that they delayed surgery for 3 days to stabilize him because he wouldn’t have survived the stress of surgery otherwise.

For those tumultuous first two months of my older son’s life, my feelings of love had that same painful, overwhelming intensity that I associate with R.  In fact, when my second child, my daughter, was born 18 months after her older brother, I had a hard time bonding with her.  When I got pregnant with R a few years later I opened up to my midwife about the trouble I had bonding with my daughter when she was first born.  I remember telling her that I didn’t understand it- everything was so easy with my daughter compared to what happened with her older brother.  She was perfectly healthy, never even lost an ounce of her birth weight.  Everything went perfectly.  So why had it taken 6 weeks for me to bond with her?  Why had I felt so confused and apathetic?  My midwife suggested that that was just it.  My only association with a new baby was one of extremely high stress and intense emotion.  My normal meter for what it was like to have a newborn was very off, and it probably impacted me when I had my daughter.

I think the midwife was right.  And while it took a few weeks, one day, just overnight, something clicked and that solid mama bond formed with my daughter.

I’ve had those intense love feelings with my daughter too- times when she was in the ER after a bad fall or after having been very sick with one thing or another.  The same goes for my oldest son over the years.  But that intense-emotion thing is not my day-to-day feeling for them.   But it is for me with R.  And I am realizing that for years we’ve existed in that high-stakes, high stress, intense, overwhelming please-don’t let-him-be-hurt-please-don’t-take-him-from-us place with R.  He is vulnerable in so many ways that my other children aren’t.  I am constantly, yet often subconsciously, on alert for him.  He’s four and a half and I still wake in the middle of the night in that irrational half-asleep panic where I have to check his breathing to make sure he didn’t somehow stop breathing in his sleep.  This is something I did with all my kids when they were newborn babies.  One of those weird irrational new mom panic things.  But with R it never went away.  And it still hasn’t.

And I think it all just reflects where we are at with R.  That primal “mama bear” protective emotion is always going full throttle.  My feelings are so intense for him, so much I’m bursting at times and it hurts.  But I don’t love him more than my other children.  It’s just that place, that parent “mode” we go to to protect our young when we feel that they are threatened.  Only with most kids that mode is temporary, like using the 4 wheel drive to get out of the mud or drive through snow.  It’s not a mode you use all the time for most parents or with most kids.  But with R we are always there.

That’s how I see it anyway.  I wonder if it will lessen as he gets older and I don’t know.  I do know that I don’t see it as a bad thing.  It’s intense, but it also makes the good moments of each day (of which there are many!) shine so much brighter.  I hope as my other children grow up they see it for what it is and know without doubts that we love them just as much as their brother.  I think they do understand it right now, and I often see the same fierce, protective love in their own interactions with their brother.  Isn’t it funny how small children can understand effortlessly things that become a lot harder to understand when you’re older?  I hope this is an understanding they are able to hold on to.  I love them so much.  I am so proud of them.  Every single day.  Even when I’m grumpy and snappy.  Maybe especially then.  I don’t know if I would have been as gracious and sweet and thoughtful if I were in their shoes.  They amaze me, and maybe one day they will read this, in fact I hope they do.  I love you guys!

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Words

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You might think hearing your nonverbal four year old use a word to request something he wants or needs would be wonderful, exciting, fantastic, or any other number of positive adjectives.  But for me it is almost always heartbreaking and agonizing.  This is because R generally only manages to push the word out for what he needs when he has reached a level of utter agony and desperation. You can see on his face in those moments that he has employed every possible tortured, screaming brain cell in the task of forcing out a single word in a last-ditch effort to make us understand.  Most of the time this happens with the word “cookie,” which may not seem like a desperate situation, but it is.

Reza has a very important night waking ritual, and that is that when he wakes in the middle of the night he eats chocolate chip cookies and drinks some water, and then he goes back to sleep.  He repeats this in the morning when he wakes for the day.  He does this every day, and in the absence of this ritual he essentially has what amounts to a panic attack.  It is extremely mentally painful for him.  We always know what he needs (his cookies), but occasionally we have run out without realizing and it’s 3am and there are no cookies anywhere and he is screaming in pain and terror because the cookies need to be there and they’re not.  He tries every way he knows to tell us what he needs.  He leads me by the hand to the cabinet over and over.  He leads his Dad to the cabinet.  He screams and sobs and violently throws anything we try to offer in place of the missing cookies.  And sometimes, sometimes, in that moment of extreme distress he manages to push the word “cookie” desperately out of his mouth, spending the last of his strength to do so, hoping this might finally cause us to understand his need and to provide it for him.  It tears my heart to pieces because there is nothing I can do and I know his having produced that word at all is a measure of his agony.

Once, something like this happened during the afternoon while his after school therapist and a new BCBA were present.  Later that week we had his annual IEP meeting and the new home BCBA came with.  While we were discussing R’s communication needs she piped up and recounted how she heard him say “cookie” when he was extremely distressed and desperate.  She suggested to the team that we withhold highly preferred items until he gets desperate enough to say the word to request.  My mouth was open to object but R’s special education teacher beat me to it.  “No,” she said, “we’ve learned from working with R that while he can sometimes say a word, he often later loses the word(s) and genuinely cannot produce the word anymore.”  She went on to reiterate the focus on PECS and other nonverbal communication strategies for R.  Have I mentioned how much I love this teacher?  No kid should be tortured into producing speech, let alone when they often legitimately cannot produce that speech no matter how desperate they are.

But of course there ARE times when R occasionally says a word and it fills me with awe, excitement, and pride.  These are times when he echoes a word out of the blue with no apparent intent- usually a word from hid iPad program such as “giraffe” or “strawberry.”  He will say the word to himself over and over in a happy, sing-song cadence with a sweet little grin on his face and it fills up my heart.  When I sing his word back to him his whole face lights up with pleasure and I feel there is nothing more right than this moment.

The take home message from this post?  So-called “functional” speech is clearly not all it’s cracked up to be. 😉